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Let Kredcor be your debt collectors

Improve your cash flow, minimise your credit risk – let Kredcor deal with all your debtors, and get your money back!

See what our clients say about us as their debt collectors, you can be next! We adapt to you, not the other way around!

You can contact us now, to see how we can help you – or just complete the form below, and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

A dedicated Portfolio Manager will help you with:

  • collection of your overdue accounts
  • setting up, or revising, your credit application
  • trace delinquent debtors
  • deal with difficult debtors
  • improve your cash flow and minimising your credit risk
  • collect your debt, anywhere in the world

Thank you for visiting us, we would like to work with you, and become your debt collector of choice!

Kredcor

Just add your details above, and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Great SEO Tips Everyone Needs To Know

If you had a dollar for every service available on the market that says it can take your site to the top of the rankings in just a few weeks, you wouldn’t even need to be in web business. You’d be wealthy already. Stay away from those services and handle the SEO yourself. It’s not hard to do, especially if you just follow these SEO tips to get you started and help you to stay on track.

Great SEO Tips

A way to bring your website to the top of a list in a search engine is to promote your website or product on various aggregator websites such as Digg, Fark, Reddit, or StumbleUpon. The more prominent linkages you can create through websites such as these will provide more credibility to your website. This will in turn provide the search bots more evidence that your website it valuable and worth putting near the top.

To optimize their websites’ position on search index results pages, savvy webmasters will register plenty of articles at article databasing sites. An article on such a database will include a link back to the owner’s website. This link will be noted by search engines and contribute to the site’s position in the search index.

Instead of writing in AP style, use SEO style to improve search engine optimization. In this way, you should utilize keywords often while not making your writing choppy or nonsensical. One reason using keywords will improve your rankings on search engines is that search engine spiders work by locating and weighting keywords.

In order to improve your search engine optimization, use as much natural language as possible. Don’t pack your text full of keywords as search engines will count this against you, knowing it has been a trick to boost search rankings in the past. Instead, use carefully chosen keywords sparsely throughout your text.

When you syndicate press releases by sending out a press release for local or national coverage and link yourself into it and help create search engine optimization. A press release is great to write when you are offering new services and products. Syndicating your press release will increase search engine result placement.

Use an XML sitemap generator to build an XML sitemap for your website. Upload it into the same directory as your home page. Edit the robot.txt file to point to the sitemap page. Search engines love seeing sitemaps. This is quick way to help your site improve its rank without disturbing other elements of the site.

Grow Your Business

Realizing that search engine optimization is not a onetime event is important. In order to grow your business and prosper, you will need to constantly monitor and work on your search engine optimization. Search engine algorithms change frequently, new businesses will establish websites, competition will increase, and a variety of other factors will impact you and your company. Stay on top of your search engine optimization and you are sure to succeed.

To help you optimize your search results, identify the top keywords in the category your customers are searching for. Then write articles or blog posts that include these keywords to draw people to your website. This will help you optimize and improve your search engine results and help you grow your business.

How To

To really get ahead in the web business game and earn a high ranking for your business, it is imperative that you learn about HTML title and Meta tags. You need to learn how to use them for your own site and also which tags your competitors are using. With a little bit of research, you will quickly learn about how to use quality tags and ultimately earn higher placement.

To optimize search engine results, never change or retire a page without a 301 redirect. A 404 (page not found) is the absolutely worst case scenario a server can deliver. A 301 redirect tells the search engine the new ULR and transfers that into the search position. Learning how to do a 301 redirect is simple and will keep your search engine results optimal.

You can easily learn SEO or search engine optimization online by using the many guides that are out there. Each search engine has a similar way to place the content of your website into a SEO type arrangement to generate higher rankings and visibility. The trick is to learn how to do it.

The server you are using should be configured to remain case sensitive with regards to URL’s. Having a server that isn’t configured to be case sensitive is a recipe for disaster.

Tips

If you are planning on handling the SEO yourself, you have to immerse yourself in the field and really become a student of SEO. Check out various courses around the net, and ask other site owners for little tips of the trade that you may not be able to find by reading articles. SEO is a process, and you should be learning about it every step of the way.

You can learn SEO on your own. There are many resources you can turn to for help. Plenty of websites exist that can help you become an SEO master.

To increase your traffic, create content that people want to link to. You can attract people with pictures and diagrams, ‘how to’ articles or a list of top 10 tips. Once you find a method that works, keep creating content using the same structure. Provide useful information that people will be interested in enough to create a link to it.

To improve search engine optimization, consider repeating the primary keyword or keywords for your web page, in all of the page titles. For example, if you are a running coach, you may want to title your pages “Running Form,” “Running Therapy,” “Running Tips,” “Running Groups” or something similar. Repeating your primary keyword, indicates to search engines that this keyword is very important.

As you can see, SEO isn’t hard at all. It might all be Greek to you at this point, but given a little bit of time, the mystery will start to unravel and you will understand what it expected of you by the search engines, if you want your site found among the similar sites in your category.

What is bookkeeping

Bookkeeping is the recording of financial transactions, and is part of the process of accounting in business.

What is bookkeeping

Transactions include purchases, sales, receipts, and payments by an individual person or an organization/corporation. There are several standard methods of bookkeeping, such as the single-entry bookkeeping system and the double-entry bookkeeping system, but, while they may be thought of as “real” bookkeeping, any process that involves the recording of financial transactions is a bookkeeping process.

Bookkeeping is usually performed by a bookkeeper. A bookkeeper (or book-keeper) is a person who records the day-to-day financial transactions of a business. He or she is usually responsible for writing the daybooks, which contain records of purchases, sales, receipts, and payments. The bookkeeper is responsible for ensuring that all transactions are recorded in the correct daybook, supplier’s ledger, customer ledger, and general ledger; an accountant can then create reports from the information concerning the financial transactions recorded by the bookkeeper.

The bookkeeper brings the books to the trial balance stage: an accountant may prepare the income statement and balance sheet using the trial balance and ledgers prepared by the bookkeeper.

History
The term “waste book” was a term used in colonial America referring to bookkeeping. The purpose was to document daily transactions including receipts and expenditures. This was recorded in chronological order, and the purpose was for temporary use only. The daily transactions would then be recorded in a daybook or account ledger in order to balance an accounts. The name “waste book” comes from the fact that once the waste book’s data were transferred to the actual journal, the waste book could be discarded.

Process
The bookkeeping process primarily records the financial effects of transactions. The difference between a manual and any electronic accounting system results from the former’s latency between the recording of a financial transaction and its posting in the relevant account. This delay—absent in electronic accounting systems due to nearly instantaneous posting into relevant accounts—is a basic characteristic of manual systems, thus giving rise to primary books of accounts such as Cash Book, Bank Book, Purchase Book, and Sales Book for recording the immediate effect of a financial transaction.

In the normal course of business, a document is produced each time a transaction occurs. Sales and purchases usually have invoices or receipts. Deposit slips are produced when lodgements (deposits) are made to a bank account. Checks (spelled “cheques” in the UK and several other countries) are written to pay money out of the account. Bookkeeping first involves recording the details of all of these source documents into multi-column journals (also known as books of first entry or daybooks). For example, all credit sales are recorded in the sales journal; all cash payments are recorded in the cash payments journal. Each column in a journal normally corresponds to an account. In the single entry system, each transaction is recorded only once. Most individuals who balance their check-book each month are using such a system, and most personal-finance software follows this approach.

After a certain period, typically a month, each column in each journal is totalled to give a summary for that period. Using the rules of double-entry, these journal summaries are then transferred to their respective accounts in the ledger, or account book. For example, the entries in the Sales Journal are taken and a debit entry is made in each customer’s account (showing that the customer now owes us money), and a credit entry might be made in the account for “Sale of class 2 widgets” (showing that this activity has generated revenue for us). This process of transferring summaries or individual transactions to the ledger is called posting. Once the posting process is complete, accounts kept using the “T” format undergo balancing, which is simply a process to arrive at the balance of the account.

As a partial check that the posting process was done correctly, a working document called an unadjusted trial balance is created. In its simplest form, this is a three-column list. Column One contains the names of those accounts in the ledger which have a non-zero balance. If an account has a debit balance, the balance amount is copied into Column Two (the debit column); if an account has a credit balance, the amount is copied into Column Three (the credit column). The debit column is then totalled, and then the credit column is totalled. The two totals must agree—which is not by chance—because under the double-entry rules, whenever there is a posting, the debits of the posting equal the credits of the posting. If the two totals do not agree, an error has been made, either in the journals or during the posting process. The error must be located and rectified, and the totals of the debit column and the credit column recalculated to check for agreement before any further processing can take place.

Once the accounts balance, the accountant makes a number of adjustments and changes the balance amounts of some of the accounts. These adjustments must still obey the double-entry rule: for example, the inventory account and asset account might be changed to bring them into line with the actual numbers counted during a stocktake. At the same time, the expense account associated with usage of inventory is adjusted by an equal and opposite amount. Other adjustments such as posting depreciation and prepayments are also done at this time. This results in a listing called the adjusted trial balance. It is the accounts in this list, and their corresponding debit or credit balances, that are used to prepare the financial statements.

Finally financial statements are drawn from the trial balance, which may include:

  • the income statement, also known as the statement of financial results, profit and loss account, or P&L
  • the balance sheet, also known as the statement of financial position
  • the cash flow statement
  • the statement of retained earnings, also known as the statement of total recognised gains and losses or statement of changes in equity
  • Entry systems
  • Two common bookkeeping systems used by businesses and other organizations are the single-entry bookkeeping system and the double-entry bookkeeping system. Single-entry bookkeeping uses only income and expense accounts, recorded primarily in a revenue and expense journal. Single-entry bookkeeping is adequate for many small businesses. Double-entry bookkeeping requires posting (recording) each transaction twice, using debits and credits.

Single-entry system
The primary bookkeeping record in single-entry bookkeeping is the cash book, which is similar to a checking account (UK: cheque account, current account) register, but allocates the income and expenses to various income and expense accounts. Separate account records are maintained for petty cash, accounts payable and receivable, and other relevant transactions such as inventory and travel expenses. These days, single-entry bookkeeping can be done with DIY bookkeeping software to speed up manual calculations.

Double-entry system
A double-entry bookkeeping system is a set of rules for recording financial information in a financial accounting system in which every transaction or event changes at least two different nominal ledger accounts.

Daybooks
A daybook is a descriptive and chronological (diary-like) record of day-to-day financial transactions also called a book of original entry. The daybook’s details must be entered formally into journals to enable posting to ledgers.

Daybooks include:

  • Sales daybook, for recording all the sales invoices.
  • Sales credits daybook, for recording all the sales credit notes.
  • Purchases daybook, for recording all the purchase invoices.
  • Purchases Debits daybook, for recording all the purchase Debit notes.
  • Cash daybook, usually known as the cash book, for recording all money received as well as money paid out. It may be split into two daybooks: receipts daybook for money received in, and payments daybook for money paid out.
  • General Journal daybook, for recording journals.

Petty cash book

A petty cash book is a record of small-value purchases before they are later transferred to the ledger and final accounts; it is maintained by a petty or junior cashier. This type of cash book usually uses the imprest system: a certain amount of money is provided to the petty cashier by the senior cashier. This money is to cater for minor expenditures (hospitality, minor stationery, casual postage, and so on) and is reimbursed periodically on satisfactory explanation of how it was spent.

Journals
Journals are recorded in the general journal daybook. A journal is a formal and chronological record of financial transactions before their values are accounted for in the general ledger as debits and credits. A company can maintain one journal for all transactions, or keep several journals based on similar activity (e.g., sales, cash receipts, revenue, etc.), making transactions easier to summarize and reference later. For every debit journal entry recorded, there must be an equivalent credit journal entry to maintain a balanced accounting equation.

Ledgers
A ledger is a record of accounts. These accounts are recorded separately, showing their beginning/ending balance. A journal lists financial transactions in chronological order, without showing their balance but showing how much is going to be charged in each account. A ledger takes each financial transaction from the journal and records it into the corresponding account for every transaction listed. The ledger also sums up the total of every account, which is transferred into the balance sheet and the income statement.

There are three different kinds of ledgers that deal with book-keeping:

  • Sales ledger, which deals mostly with the accounts receivable account. This ledger consists of the records of the financial transactions made by customers to the business.
  • Purchase ledger is the record of the purchasing transactions a company does; it goes hand in hand with the Accounts Payable account.
  • General ledger, representing the original five, main accounts: assets, liabilities, equity, income, and expenses.

Abbreviations used in bookkeeping
A/C – Account
Acc – Account
A/R – Accounts receivable
A/P – Accounts payable
B/S – Balance sheet
c/d – Carried down
b/d – Brought down
c/f – Carried forward
b/f – Brought forward
Dr – Debit
Cr – Credit
G/L – General ledger; (or N/L – nominal ledger)
P&L – Profit and loss; (or I/S – income statement)
P/R – Payroll
PP&E – Property, plant and equipment
TB – Trial Balance
GST – Goods and services tax
VAT – Value added tax
CST – Central sale tax
TDS – Tax deducted at source
AMT – Alternate minimum tax
EBITDA – Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation
EBDTA – Earnings before depreciation, taxes and amortisation
EBT – Earnings before tax
EAT – Earnings after tax
PAT – Profit after tax
PBT – Profit before tax
Depr – Depreciation
Dep – Depreciation
CPO – Cash paid out
CP – Cash Payment

Chart of accounts
A chart of accounts is a list of the accounts codes that can be identified with numeric, alphabetical, or alphanumeric codes allowing the account to be located in the general ledger. The equity section of the chart of accounts is based on the fact that the legal structure of the entity is of a particular legal type. Possibilities include sole trader, partnership, trust, and company.

Computerized bookkeeping
Computerized bookkeeping removes many of the paper “books” that are used to record the financial transactions of an entity—instead, relational databases take their place, but they still typically enforce the double-entry bookkeeping system and methodology.